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What is that smell!?!?!?

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( 4 Votes )

Ahhh…. The time has finally arrived to taste the magical elixir you have been pouring your heart and soul into. You draw some wine from the carboy and drain it into a glass. You carefully swirl the wine in the glass to release the bouquet, anticipating the magical aromas and flavors to come. You tilt the glass and inhale the beautiful aroma… cough, cough, what the!?!? You jerk back from the glass frantically trying to get the awful smell out of your nose. Not quite what you expected. Unfortunately, it has happened to all of us at some point.

Here are some common problems experienced in winemaking and a few suggestions on how to correct or better yet, prevent them. No matter how easy the cure sounds, remember an ounce of cure is worth a pound of prevention. So rather than counting on the cures to help you out, it’s always best to prevent the problems to begin with.



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Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 April 2011 20:30 Read more...
 

Question of the Week: How Can I Increase The Alcohol Content?

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I received an email the other day asking what kind of sugar was needed to increase the alcohol content of a typical wine to 13 or 14% and I thought this would make a great blog post!

So if you’re interested in learning how you can increase the alcohol content of your wine read on!

What you’ll want to use is corn sugar, which you can buy from your local wine making supply shop.

Incidentally - if you’re into making your own beer you can use it also to carbonate your beer in the bottle (so it has multiple uses).

To increase your alcohol level you typically would do this as part of the primary fermentation and it is called “chaptalization” and is a common practice when making port or other fortified wines to increase the alcohol content.

Basically you let your primary fermentation happen and once the S.G. reduces to the point when you would rack to your secondary you add the sugar to your wine must (in the primary) so that you can reenergize the yeast to produce more alcohol (typically adds another 3 or 4 %).

So in essence you are doing your primary fermentation twice before you transfer your wine must to your secondary.

I followed this procedure when I made a chocolate raspberry port kit from Winexpert and I can tell you it definitely works.

To help you all further I tracked down some online instructions from Winexpert for one of their port kits  and this should point you in the right direction if you wanted to give it a try.

Wineexpert Downloadable Wine Kit Instructions:

Try it and let me know how it goes!

- Scott “The Wine Making Guy”

P.S.  To find out how you can easily calculate the alcohol of your wine read “Easiest Way To Calculate The Alcohol Content Of Your Wine

P.S.S. He was also curious if the extra alcohol affected the taste and if so how. Would love to hear your comments on this!


Source: All Winemaking


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Bungs, Stoppers Closures - Say What?

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Regardless of what you call them bungs, stoppers or closures - you need them. They aren#8217;t usually given any attention, but where would wine making be without them? For one thing, if you didn#8217;t have one where would you put your airlock? Seriously, these items are important. They work in conjunction with air locks to [...]img src="http://feeds2.feedburner.com/~r/VintnersCircle/~4/jBDJvUOdATE" height="1" width="1"/
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Better-Bottle PET Carboys - How Do They Compare?

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We all agree that carboys are a vital part of your wine making equipment. First, it is important to answer the question, #8220;What is a Better-Bottle® carboy and why is it different from what I see at the water cooler?#8221; As the Better-Bottle® website tells us Better Bottle carboys are made of special polyethylene terephthalate [...]img src="http://feeds2.feedburner.com/~r/VintnersCircle/~4/2OqFRwqg_5k" height="1" width="1"/
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Carboys - Everyone Needs A Couple

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A carboy is the container used most during wine making. They come in various sizes, but are most common in 3 gallon, 5 gallon and 6 gallon. Carboys have a narrow neck with a small opening at the top for a stopper and an airlock. Carboys are primarily made of glass or PET plastic, commonly [...]img src="http://feeds2.feedburner.com/~r/VintnersCircle/~4/AlSWNPAtCEM" height="1" width="1"/
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