Vintner Resources

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What is that smell!?!?!?

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( 4 Votes )

Ahhh…. The time has finally arrived to taste the magical elixir you have been pouring your heart and soul into. You draw some wine from the carboy and drain it into a glass. You carefully swirl the wine in the glass to release the bouquet, anticipating the magical aromas and flavors to come. You tilt the glass and inhale the beautiful aroma… cough, cough, what the!?!? You jerk back from the glass frantically trying to get the awful smell out of your nose. Not quite what you expected. Unfortunately, it has happened to all of us at some point.

Here are some common problems experienced in winemaking and a few suggestions on how to correct or better yet, prevent them. No matter how easy the cure sounds, remember an ounce of cure is worth a pound of prevention. So rather than counting on the cures to help you out, it’s always best to prevent the problems to begin with.



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Last Updated on Tuesday, 12 April 2011 20:30 Read more...
 

Wine making and sulfites.

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( 12 Votes )

Potassium Metabisulfite is a stable source of sulfites in winemaking. The use of sulfur compounds is not a recent innovation. The Dutch shipping companies popularized the use of sulfur in the 16th century by refusing to ship any wines not treated. They insisted on the use of sulfites because the treated wines were the only ones that survived a long sea voyage without spoiling.

Sulfites work by releasing free sulfur dioxide, which inhibits yeast, mold and bacteria. It does this in two ways: one, it kills some of the organisms outright, and two, it blocks the surviving organisms’ ability to reproduce. If your winemaking equipment is physically clean and you’ve rinsed it with a sulfite solution, nothing will grow on it for a short period of time.

To help prevent oxidation, sulfites are also added directly to wine after fermentation. Wine oxidation follows the same pattern that you see in the cut



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Last Updated on Thursday, 26 February 2009 17:13 Read more...
 

Fining and Fining Agents

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( 4 Votes )

Most winemakers use one or another of the available fining agents prior to filtering and think of fining only as a clarifying agent. While that is indeed the main purpose for fining any wine, fining actually can be done for several other reasons including colour, odour, flavour and stability.



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Last Updated on Saturday, 07 March 2009 01:02 Read more...
 

Malolactic Fermentation

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( 3 Votes )

WHAT IS IT?
Malolactic fermentation is the conversion by bacteria of malic acid into CO2 and lactic acid.
One gram of malic acid converts roughly into 0.67 grams of lactic acid and 0.33 grams of CO2.


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Last Updated on Tuesday, 10 March 2009 03:17 Read more...
 

Residual CO2

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( 2 Votes )

Q: I am a new wine maker in New Jersey. I made my first batch this year with my father and have a question about a phenomenon I've experienced with my wine. After crushing and fermenting for about a week, we placed our wine in 5 gal glass jugs for continued fermentation (last September). In late December after the fermentation stopped, we decanted the wine into other 5 gal jugs. As we did that, I took a taste and noticed that it was bubbly, not visibly, but when you drank it you could feel it on your tongue. Otherwise it tastes great. Do you have any idea why this has occurred?


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